Hummingbirds, more hummingbirds in Costa Rica


Dear Kitty. Some blog

Purple-throated mountaingem hummingbird female, Cinchona, 15 March 2014

This is a photo of a female purple-throated mountaingem hummingbird, which we saw 15 March 2014 in Cinchona in Costa Rica. We will get there later in this blog post.

I have described walking in the Poas volcano area in Costa Rica on that 15 March.

As we walked back down, a hummingbird flying around a scrub. It was rather big (I mean, big for a hummingbird …) and looked greenish. We saw mainly its back. Later, we would see this species, the fiery-throated hummingbird, much better, including its splendid colours under favourable lighting.

A slaty flowerpiercer was there as well.

A bit further, in the undergrowth: a wrenthrush. This is a species, unique to Costa Rica and Panama. Also, a large-footed-finch.

Then, lower on the Poas slope, to a garden opposite a restaurant, where feeders attracted hummingbirds.

Green-crowned brilliant female, in Costa Rica, 15 March 2014

Among them were a female green-crowned brilliant. A…

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Misdirection, April Fool’s Day Erasure Poem by Cara Rosalie Olsen


Silver Birch Press

Image
MISDIRECTION
by Cara Rosalie Olsen

I told you to look right,

then I went left.

SOURCE: “Misdirection” by Cara Rosalie Olsen is based on page 41 of The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger (Little Brown, 1991 edition).

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Cara Rosalie Olsen resides in sunny Southern California, where she lives with her very patient husband, Michael, and their spoiled pooch, Annabella. Awakening Foster Kelly, a Young Adult Contemporary, is Cara’s first novel, available at Amazon.com. Her second, Much as Funny Loves a Laugh is scheduled to be released in the summer of 2014. Her flash-fiction has been featured in Lightening Cake, & Hogglepot. If Cara wasn’t a full-time writer, she would have liked to join the cast of Saturday Night Live, or taken over as CEO of Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. Visit her at cararosalieolsen.com.

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The Cloak of Dawn award


Cloak of Dawn award

The lovely Dr. Rex nominated me for the new Cloak of Dawn award, created by Martin, from http://mavadelo.wordpress.com/

Here’s what Martin had to say on the creation of the new award.

“The Cloak of Dawn award

The idea behind this award: We all know bloggers that write about the issues in this world be it animal abuse, child abuse, equality, their family, love, friendship, the love of whatever deity they worship and so on. We also know many blogger that besides blogging has to take care of a loved one because they are sick, have a disability or are otherwise not able to do everything by themselves. For these bloggers I created this award. The award is named in the spirit of a voluntary care giver and mother that does not blog herself and therefore can not receive the award herself .

Why a cloak? Well, in Dutch we call a voluntary caregiver (as described above) a “mantel zorger” which translates literal to “cloak carer” hence the cloak and the Rod of Aesculapius.

This award has some special rules due to its intend. Whereas most awards are shared after you have gotten it yourself, this award will be free to hand out at each and everyone’s own discretion BUT you must make sure that the intend of the award is upheld.

~~DA Rules~~

Display the award on your blog, either on a special awards page or in your side bar

If you have a nominee yourself tell them of their nomination

Make clear in your nomination blog why you have nominated the person. is it for his/her blogging or for his/her voluntary care that they give to their loved one/friend/kid/ grandparents/animals, etc. etc.

There is no limit on how many people you can nominate as long as the spirit of the award remains intact.

This award can’t be declined.”

 

My nominees

  1. petchary – who has dedicated herself to protecting and caring for the less fortunate in Jamaica
  2. inavukic – who users her blog to help right the wrongs that many of the Croatian people have suffered for generations.
  3. tersiaburger – who selflessly took care of her daughter during her entire illness, and was with her at the end

Assassination


MLK

Martin Luther King Jr. Assassinated

At 6:01 p.m. on April 4, 1968, King was fatally shot at the Lorraine Motel.

By Jennifer Rosenberg

6:01 p.m. on April 4, 1968, civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was hit by a sniper’s bullet. King had been standing on the balcony in front of his room at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, when, without warning, he was shot. The .30-caliber rifle bullet entered King’s right cheek, traveled through his neck, and finally stopped at his shoulder blade. King was immediately taken to a nearby hospital but was pronounced dead at 7:05 p.m.

Violence and controversy followed. In outrage of the murder, many blacks took to the streets across the United States in a massive wave of riots. The FBI investigated the crime, but many believed them partially or fully responsible for the assassination. An escaped convict by the name of James Earl Ray was arrested, but many people, including some of Martin Luther King Jr.’s own family, believe he was innocent.

What happened that evening?

 

Martin Luther King Jr: A Dedicated Leader

When Martin Luther King, Jr. emerged as the leader of the a Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1955, he began a long tenure as the spokesperson for nonviolent protest in the Civil Rights Movement. As a Baptist minister, he was a moral leader to the community. Plus, he was charismatic and had a powerful way of speaking. He was also a man of vision and determination. He never stopped dreaming of what could be.

Yet he was a man, not a God. He was most often overworked and overtired. And he had a fondness for the private company of women. And though he was the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize winner, he did not have complete control over the Civil Rights Movement.

By 1968, violence had edged its way into the movement. Black Panther Party members carried loaded weapons; riots had erupted across the country; and numerous civil rights organizations had taken up the mantra “Black Power!”

Yet Martin Luther King held strong to his beliefs, even as he saw the Civil Rights Movement being torn in two. Violence is what brought King back to Memphis in April 1968.

 

Striking Sanitation Workers in Memphis

On February 12, thirteen hundred African-American sanitation workers in Memphis went on strike. Though there had been a long history of grievances, the strike was begun as a response to a January 31 incident in which 22 black sanitation workers were sent home without pay during bad weather while all the white workers remained on the job. When the City of Memphis refused to negotiate with the 1,300 striking workers, King and other civil rights leaders were asked to visit Memphis in support.

On Monday, March 18, King managed to fit in a quick stop in Memphis, where he spoke to over 15,000 who had gathered at Mason Temple. Ten days later, King arrived in Memphis to lead a march in support of the striking workers. Unfortunately, as King led the crowd, a few of the protesters got rowdy and smashed the windows of a storefront. The violence spread and soon countless others had taken up sticks and were breaking windows and looting stores.

Police moved in to disperse the crowd. Some of the marchers threw stones at the police. The police responded with tear gas and nightsticks. At least one of the marchers was shot and killed.

King was extremely distressed at the violence that had erupted in his own march and became determined not to let violence prevail. He scheduled another march in Memphis for April 8.

On April 3, King arrived in Memphis a little later than planned because there had been a bomb threat for his flight before takeoff. That evening, King delivered his “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech to a relatively small crowd that had braved the bad weather to hear King speak. King’s thoughts were obviously on his mortality, for he discussed the plane threat as well as the time he had been stabbed. He concluded the speech with

 

Well, I don’t know what will happen now; we’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life – longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over, and I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people will get to the Promised Land. And so I’m happy tonight; I’m not worried about anything; I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

After the speech, King went back to the Lorraine Motel to rest.

Martin Luther King Stands on the Lorraine Motel Balcony

The Lorraine Motel (now the National Civil Rights Museum) was a relatively drab, two-story motor inn on Mulberry Street in downtown Memphis. Yet it had become a habit of Martin Luther King and his entourage to stay at the Lorraine Motel when they visited Memphis.
On the evening of April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King and his friends were getting dressed to have dinner with Memphis minister Billy Kyles. King was in Room 306 on the second floor and hurried to get dressed since they were, as usual, running a bit late. While putting on his shirt and using Magic Shave Powder to shave, King chatted with Ralph Abernathy about an upcoming event.
Around 5:30 p.m., Kyles had knocked on their door to hurry them along. The three men joked about what was to be served for dinner. King and Abernathy wanted to confirm that they were going to be served “soul food” and not something like filet mignon. About half an hour later, Kyles and King stepped out from the motel room onto the balcony (basically the outside walkway that connected all the motel’s second-story rooms). Abernathy had gone to his room to put on some cologne.
Near the car in the parking lot directly below the balcony, waited James Bevel, Chauncey Eskridge (SCLC lawyer), Jesse Jackson, Hosea Williams, Andrew Young, and Solomon Jones, Jr. (the driver of the loaned white Cadillac). A few remarks were exchanged between the men waiting below and Kyles and King. Jones remarked that King should get a topcoat since it might get cold later; King replied, “O.K.”
Kyles was just a couple steps down the stairs and Abernathy was still inside the motel room when the shot rang out. Some of the men initially thought it a car backfire, but others realized it was a rifle shot. King had fallen to the concrete floor of the balcony with a large, gaping wound covering his right jaw.

Martin Luther King Jr. Shot!
Abernathy ran out of his room to see his dear friend fallen, laying in a puddle of blood. He held King’s head saying, “Martin, it’s all right. Don’t worry. This is Ralph. This is Ralph.” *
Kyles had gone into a motel room to call an ambulance while others encircled King. Marrell McCollough, an undercover Memphis police officer, grabbed a towel and tried to stop the flow of blood. Though King was unresponsive, he was still alive – but only barely.
Within fifteen minutes of the shot, Martin Luther King arrived at St. Joseph’s Hospital on a stretcher with an oxygen mask over his face. He had been hit by a .30-06 caliber rifle bullet that had entered his right jaw, then traveled through his neck, severing his spinal cord, and stopped in his shoulder blade.
The doctors tried emergency surgery but the wound was too serious. Martin Luther King, Jr. was pronounced dead at 7:05 p.m. He was 39 years old.

 

Ihaveadream

And this was the end to a dream. First John F. Kennedy and then Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. They were soon to be followed by the loss of Robert Kennedy. Had these three men survived we would have an entirely different America. A more loving, more accepting, more inclusive America  than we know now. So in memory, of Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr., I am honoring his life and his death today. I thank God he did live even if it was too short of a time. I thank him for having a dream and sharing it with all of us. I am sorry that so many have turned from his message. I declare that I for one, will always remember him and what he gave his life for. I will love all of my brothers and sisters. I will remind others of your great words.

Thank you, Doctor King, for your vision.