Equal Pay for Women


Women all over the world face inequality when it comes to pay.  It’s not just in the United States.

It shouldn’t be that way.  We make strides — for a while — but it never lasts.

Each of us needs to determine, in our own minds, what we are worth.  Then we need to stand up and clearly declare our value as a Person, not just as a Woman.

Traditionally, women devalue themselves — we are taught to do so — but we are NOT worth less than men.  We are not “weaker” then men, we are not less smart, we are not less capable.

Genitalia  do not equal worth.  The willingness to work, the intelligence to work, that is what matters in the work place.  It should be all that matters.  But, until we, as women, value ourselves, our employers will not.

 

Below is a TED talk that helps illuminate the problem.

TED Talk Published on Jul 22, 2015

Veronique sheds light on her efforts for the past 10 years to ensure equal pay for females in the workplace. As an advocate, a business-leader, a mother, and a wife, she shares how the threads of her efforts have been intertwined and effected by these elements in her life.

 

bjwordpressdivider (1)

 

I Would Never Hurt You


In reality, in the United States, a lot of men say “I won’t ever hurt you”, but they will look benignly at bruises and fractured bones or black eyes, and feel that they haven’t done anything.

 

But they have.  They have physically abused you.  They have battered you.

 

And they will promise over and over again not to ever do it again.  But they will.  And each incident will be a little worse than the one before.

 

An abuser is trying to break your self-esteem, your self-confidence, YOU.   He wants to control you and keep you in his power.  When he says you can’t leave him , what he’s really saying is he can’t lose his power and control over you.

 

You need to contact your local shelter or the national help hotline.  Get counseling.  Make an escape plan, before you’re hurt so badly you don’t care anymore that you’re hurt.  Leave, before he kills you.

 

There is legal help for you in every state.  The laws and penalties for battering vary by state, but your local shelter will help you get through the process.  They know what to do.

 

It is time to begin a new, violence-free phase of your life.

 

All you have to do is reach out.

bjwordpressdivider (1)

 

DomesticViolenceHotline

bjwordpressdivider (1)

 

Namaste,

Barbara

Dreams in the Night


I’ve been a bit under the weather lately, fighting off a flu that hit my second-oldest grandson hard this last week.
When I am slightly feverish, I get some odd dreams sometimes — nothing that I can remember, but enough to make me unsettled when I wake.

 

This song, by one of my favorite artists, Stevie Nicks, speaks to me of those odd dreams, fever-dreams.  The song is Moonlight (Vampire Dreams) from her 2011 Album In Your Dreams.
I hope you enjoy it.

 

bjwordpressdivider (1)

 

 

Georgetown University Commits to Addressing Racial Injustice, Establishing African-American Studies Dept.


GOOD BLACK NEWS

georgetown university logo

article via jbhe.com

John J. DeGioia, president of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., made a major commitment to address racial issues on campus. Last fall students staged a sit-in outside the president’s office demanding the university address its past ties to slavery, increase the number of Black faculty on campus, and begin an ongoing and discussion of racial issues confronting the university.

President DeGioia stated that the university would create a major in African American studies and create an academic department in the field or a larger interdisciplinary program in the discipline. He also said that the university would establish a new research center “focused on racial injustice and the persistent and enduring legacy of racism and segregation in the American experience.” He vowed to recruit an appropriate number of faculty members to support the research center and African American studies initiative and to hire a new senior executive…

View original post 96 more words

Respect Award


Clarion Alley 2012

Clarion Alley 2012

 

The wonderful Dr. Rex has been kind enough to nominate me for the Respect Award:

 

The “Respect Award” is a personal award, made by Robert Goldstein, for fellow bloggers who consistently reach out to other bloggers, offer support, are kind, struggle to understand differences in people, and who treat themselves and other people with kindness and respect.

You don’t have to do anything for this award.

You can choose to copy the Award Picture and give the award to the people who have earned your respect or you can do nothing.

This is a way of saying thank you.

You have earned my respect.

 

I am touched beyond words to have the respect of this wonderful, caring, thoughtful woman, whom I am privileged to call “friend”.

 

My own nominees for this award are:

  1. RoSy
  2. Rajogapol
  3. Crowing Crone Joss
  4. Xena
  5. Petchary
  6. Inavukic
  7. The Wine Wankers
  8. SeaAngel4444
  9. InsaneOwl
  10. Michael Lai
  11. Petrel41
  12. ValentineLogar

 

A True Heroine and an Inspiration in a Time of Hate


I found this on the “A Mighty Girl” Facebook site, a story of a truly remarkable, brave woman who, during World War II, was so ruled by love that she saved thousands of Jewish children.

 

I think, in today’s world where hate is dominating our lives, news and elections, we could all learn from her goodness and love.

 

 

IreneSadler

A Mighty Girl
February 15 at 10:15am ·
Today in Mighty Girl history, Irena Sendler — one of the great, unsung heroes of the WWII who led a secret operation that successfully smuggled 2,500 Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto, saving them from almost certain death — was born in 1910.
Sendler was a Polish Catholic nurse and social worker who began aiding Jews as early as 1939 after the Germans invaded Poland. At first, she helped to create false documents for over 3,000 Jewish families and later joined the Zegota, the underground Polish resistance organization created to aid the country’s Jewish population.
In 1943, Sendler became head of Zegota’s children’s division and used her special access to the Warsaw Ghetto, granted to Social Welfare Department employees to conduct inspections for typhus, to set up a smuggling operation. She and her colleagues began secretly transporting babies and children out of the Ghetto by hiding them in an ambulance with a false bottom or in baskets, coffins, and even potato sacks. The children were then given false identities and placed with Polish families or in orphanages. To allow the children to be reunited with any surviving relatives following the war, Sendler buried lists containing the identities and locations of the children in jars.
After rescuing over 2,500 children, Sendler was arrested by the Gestapo, tortured and sentenced to death. Fortunately, Zegota was able to bribe the German guards as she was on her way to execution and she was forced to live in hiding for the remainder of the war. In 1965, Sendler was honored by Yad Vashem as one of the Polish Righteous among the Nations for her wartime efforts. She passed away in 2008 at the age of 98.
A fascinating part of Sendler’s incredible story is that it may have been entirely lost to history except for the impressive research efforts of several high school students in Kansas. In 1999, high school teacher Norm Conard encouraged three of his students, Megan Stewart, Elizabeth Cambers, and Sabrina Coons, to work on a year-long National History Day project. Starting with a short news clipping that mentioned Sendler, the girls conducted a year-long investigation into her life and, ultimately, wrote a play about Sendler entitled “Life in a Jar.”
The play ignited interest in Sendler’s story and it has been performed hundreds of times across the US, Canada, and in Poland. The young researchers also had an opportunity to meet Sendler in Poland in 2001; the forgotten hero whose amazing story they helped bring to light.
If you’d like to inspire your kids with Irena Sendler’s amazing story, we recommend the following titles for young readers:
– “Jars of Hope:How One Woman Helped Save 2,500 Children During the Holocaust” for ages 7 to 11 at http://www.amightygirl.com/jars-of-hope
– “Irena Sendler and the Children of the Warsaw Ghetto” for ages 8 to 11 at http://www.amightygirl.com/irena-sendler
– “Irena’s Jar of Secrets” for ages 6 to 10 at http://www.amightygirl.com/irena-s-jars-of-secrets
– “Irena Sendler: Bringing Life to Children of the Holocaust” for ages 10 to 14 at http://www.amightygirl.com/irena-sendler-biography
For an excellent book about Sendler’s life and the Kansas students’ project to bring her story to light, we highly recommend “Life in a Jar: The Irena Sendler Project” for ages 13 and up at http://www.amightygirl.com/life-in-a-jar-the-irena-sendler-…
There have also been two films produced about Sendler: “The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler,” starring Anna Paquin, for ages 13 and up http://www.amightygirl.com/the-courageous-heart-of-irena-sendler) and a documentary, “Irena Sendler: In the Name of Their Mothers,” for ages 12 and up (http://www.amightygirl.com/irena-sendler-in-the-name-of-their-mothers).
And, for more books for children and teens about girls and women who lived during the Holocaust period — including stories of other heroic resisters and rescuers — check out the recommendations in our blog post for Holocaust Remembrance Week at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog/?p=2726

 

May we all be able to get past the hate and bigotry and walk in a world filled with people who practice  compassion and love. May we all have the courage of our convictions and not settle for just walking through this life asleep. May we all begin to take baby steps toward peace and acceptance. Ready to care about others and to stand up for those who can’t help themselves.

 

Namaste,

Barbara