In Memoriam


CliffTruck Crop

Clifford Mattio Copyright Barbara Mattio

This is a picture of my brother-in-law, Cliff Mattio.  He was my husband’s younger brother, and after my husband died suddenly of a heart attack 19 years ago, he became my big brother.

For the last 19 years, he’s been my adventure buddy, my confidant, my partner in crime.  He’s always been there for me, and never once let me down.   He always had my back, every time.

He was a kind man, and a good man, who delighted in teasing me mercilessly, and provoked me into arguments when we took car trips together, just because it entertained him.  I hated that, but I always loved him.

We shared a love of books, book shopping and reading cookbooks.  He shared his family recipes with me, including the Mattio Family Sauce recipe, a truly Italian Pasta Sauce that his Italian grandmother taught him to cook, and which takes 3 days to cook correctly.

There wasn’t a subject we didn’t discuss, including politics and religion, and even though we didn’t always agree, we just loved to talk about it.  Some of our best times were spent just talking, often through, over and around a movie.  There were all night talk sessions more times than I can count, and I cherish them all.

We fixed all the world’s problems together, several times over the years, but unfortunately no one else was listening.

We shared a desire for kindness, compassion, peace, empathy and goodness to be manifest in our own lives, for the people around us, and for the world.

He passed away this morning at 2:30 am, after a 10 year battle with leukemia, leaving behind his two sons, Chris & Carll, and I know they will miss their father tremendously.

When he was dying, at 2:30 this morning, I was in the process of writing a him a letter, telling him how much I appreciated his strength and love and laughter over the years.

He did not want a memorial service, and his sons will honor his wishes.  In lieu of a service, I wanted to share my brother-in-law with the world, and I am going to share the letter I wrote him last night with you, in his honor and memory.

Cliff

I am so sorry you are ill.  I am sorry that you will be leaving this world.  I know that Caroline [his ex-wife], your parents and Gaylord [my husband, his older brother] will be waiting to welcome you.  There will be much gladness and joy at this reunion.

I want to thank you for being you.  For being strong when I wasn’t.  For all our crazy debates.  Thank you for loving me, for being my big brother.

Thank you for the laughs and for the tears.  Thank you for telling me I could do it — whatever ‘it’ was — when I didn’t think I could.

Thank you for trips and adventures.  Thank you for all you taught me.  There is so much I learned from you.  Thank you for accepting me as the person I am.  

Thank you for Jazz Funerals and Blues Clubs.

Thank you for never letting me down.  Never once.  As long as I live I will cherish every memory we made together.  Thank you for sharing yourself with me and letting me share who I am with you 

Thank you for sharing your boys with me.  They are fine young men and you are so proud of them, I know.

Thank you for putting sunshine back into my life.  Thank you for some of the best adventures of my life.

You are such a good man, and I was lucky Gaylord brought you into my life.

I don’t want you to suffer, so I pray for a miracle or that you will have an easy transition to your new life.

I think of you when I see a waterfall, when I look at autumn leaves.  I think of you when I am happy and when I am scared.  I remember all of the times we have shared — the very best were when we would just sit and talk.  When we solved all of life’s problems.  

I wish you a wonderful eternity.  

Thank you for sharing parts of your life with me.  

I appreciate you more than you could ever know.

In love, harmony and beauty,

Barbara

Image052

Riding the Racing Horse Carousel at Cedar Point, Sandusky, Ohio. Copyright Barbara Mattio

 

What Would You Do With Forever?


yadadarcyyada

1forever18What would you do with forever? My answer now is a lot different than it would have been when I was young. Then, I alternated between thinking I would live forever and thinking maybe I wasn’t here for a long time but at least a good time.  Now, for me, I guess a lot would depend on how I received my immortality, how I was able to live with it, and maybe attitude?

The idea of living forever or being immortal haunts humans. It has been relentlessly explored in art, literature, TV, movies, religion, philosophy…

Would you like to live forever? Or do you think you’d start to tire of it? Or you’d feel lonely and sad as those you grew to love died.

In history’s elongation, humans are really just no more than fruit flies as life span goes. We are born, we live, we die. Whether it’s hours…

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Continental Plates Split Continues Elsewhere


Kentron Intellect Research Vault

A diagram of the shifts in the San Andreas fault.

Continental Plates Split Continues Elsewhere
by, KentronIntellectResearchVault ( KIRV )

April 30, 2013 ( Originally Published: September 27, 2012 )

CALIFORNIA, Palos Verdes Penninsula – April 30, 2013 – Earthquake magnitude severity levels and frequency of earthquake swarms are increasing, and in a series of three ( 3 ) reports written by teams of geophysicts recently, it appears plates are splitting open and spreading to other tectonic plates elsewhere where its growing.

From mega earthquakes that unfortunately went publicly unrecognized for several months now, the report indicates a growing trend in ultra-deep oceanic earthquakes spreading elsewhere.

The December 26, 2004 magnitude 9.3 oceanic earthquake ( “Boxing Day Earthquake” ) resulted saw Indian Ocean tsunami deaths of 300,000 people located in several nations ( e.g. Indonesia, Thailand, and India ).

These ultradeep oceanic mega earthquakes crack open continental plates causing land and sea ocean waters to travel.

The March 2011 Japan…

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Awkward questions


Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

williamson fin cop monsal dale churches 013
I was asked a question the other day with which I am intimately acquainted but for which I had no answer. “What does it mean to lead a spiritual life?” It is not strictly true to say I have no answer. I have my own answers, but those I recognise to be subjective, not definitive. It is, I think, one of those questions to which there are as many answers as there are querents and all will hold at least part of the truth.

To begin with it begs the question of what we mean by ‘spirituality’ itself. In this day and age it is often a term held to be quite distinct from religious belief and many will say they are ‘spiritual, not religious’, yet I am not so sure you can really make that distinction. Religion is generally defined as a formalised and organised set of beliefs, where…

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Life after assault


Profound words from a woman who has been attacked.

Commentary of Juliannabbey

After I was attacked, I’ve been dealing with physical and emotional trauma. I’m feeling all, “ugh, I’ve talked my brains out about the emotional trauma” right now, so today I will be telling you about my immobilizing neck pain.

I’ve been going to physical therapy for about a month an a half, and up until a week and a half ago, had no relief in my pain. My neck muscles tighten at the base of my skull and spread to an all over head ache, and spread down in between my shoulder blades.

After leaving physical therapy, I was feeling worse. A week and a half ago I finally started to feel some relief. I thought that I could return to doing normal activities, and quickly realized that a simple act such as mopping could put me out of commission for 2 days.

I’ve started doing yoga. Nothing too crazy…

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