Scientists are watching Trump on his science denial


2,300 Leading Scientists Send Trump A Clear Warning: We’re Watching You

An open letter signed by America’s top minds hopes to counter the influence of climate change deniers and oil execs.

 

MIKE SEGAR / REUTERS
President-elect Donald Trump’s administration needs to “support and rely on science as a key input for crafting public policy,” the scientists wrote. 

More than 2,300 scientists, including 22 Nobel Prize recipients, have a warning for Donald Trump: Respect science or prepare for a fight.

In an open letter Wednesday to the president-elect and Congress, scientists representing all 50 states called on the incoming administration to sufficiently fund scientific research as well as “support and rely on science as a key input for crafting public policy.”

Anything short of that, they stressed, is a direct threat to the health and safety of Americans and people around the world.

“The consequences are real: without this investment, children will be more vulnerable to lead poisoning, more people will be exposed to unsafe drugs and medical devices, and we will be less prepared to limit the impacts of increasing extreme weather and rising seas,” the letter reads.

The letter, organized by the Union of Concerned Scientists, comes amid growing concern about what a Trump presidency will mean for combatting today’s environmental challenges, namely climate change.

Trump and his fellow climate deniers have made it quite clear where they stand on the phenomenon and funding its continued study. Trump has dismissed climate change as “bullshit” and a Chinese “hoax,” and promised to pull the U.S. out of the historic Paris climate agreement. He has also said he would cut all federal spending on the issue, increase America’s production of coal, oil and natural gas, and do away with Obama administration regulations aimed at cutting emissions.

 

“Respect for science in policymaking should be a prerequisite for any Cabinet position” – .physicist Lewis Branscomb

In the weeks since the election, Trump has only added to scientists’ concerns by selecting climate change denier Myron Ebell and fossil fuel lobbyist Mike McKennato lead transition work at the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and oil executive Harold Hamm are front-runners to head the Interior Department, and Trump’s senior adviser on space policy wants to eliminate NASA’s research into climate change.

The letter, published Wednesday, features an impressive list of signatories, including David Baltimore, president emeritus of the California Institute of Technology; Eric Chivian, the founder and director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School; and Wolfgang Ketterle, a German physicist and professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The scientists call on Trump and the 115th Congress to “adhere to high standards of scientific integrity and independence in responding to current and emerging public health and environmental threats.”

In a news release on the letter, Lewis Branscomb, a physicist and professor at the University of California, San Diego, said: “Americans recognize that science is critical to improving our quality of life, and when science is ignored or politically corrupted, it’s the American people who suffer. Respect for science in policymaking should be a prerequisite for any Cabinet position.”

The group also promised to keep a close eye on Trump ― and fight back if necessary.

“We will continue to champion efforts that strengthen the role of science in policy making and stand ready to hold accountable any who might seek to undermine it,” the letter states.

 bjwordpressdivider-1
It is illogical to not take care of Mother Earth. She will self-destruct without our peaceful intersession on her behalf. We have a responsibility to future generations of our families to protect and help her to heal. Don’t let Trump turn our world into a real dying planet.
Science is real. As it has been said, Science it True whether you believe it or not.  You can’t bury your head in the sand. This problem won’t go away. It will simply grow more serious.
Namaste,
Barbara

Trump Inauguration To Be Met by Mass “Women’s March on Washington”


Trump Inauguration To Be Met By Mass ‘Women’s March On Washington’

“We cannot allow ourselves to give up, put our heads down and not hold this administration accountable for any violation of human rights or women’s rights.”

13 women


Here Are 13 of the World’s Most Influential Women You Don’t Know Yet

Namaste,

Barbara

 

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You already know about the Power Women: the celebrities and moguls, the world leaders and dignitaries, the stars who can dominate a news cycle with a single tweet. Lots of these women—like Nicki Minaj, Caitlyn Jenner,Hillary Clinton and Angela Merkel—are on this year’s TIME 100. But influence and fame are not the same thing, and this year’s list also includes women whose impact far exceeds their fame. You may not know who they are (yet). Here’s why you should.

  • Jaha Dukureh

    jaha dukureh
    Neilson Barnard—Getty Images
    The Gambian activist is a leader in the fight to end female genital mutilation, a practice that affects more than 200 million girls worldwide. Dukureh herself was cut in Gambia when she was just about a week old. At 15, she was sent to the United States to marry a much older and unknown man. When she got married, she learned that she had been subjected to the most extreme form of genital mutilation: her clitoris and labia had been removed, and her vagina had been stitched shut with only a small hole for urination and menstruation. Now remarried and the mother of three, she’s leading a movement to end female genital mutilation worldwide, and raising awareness about the the practice in the United States: after herChange.org petition got more than 220,000 signers, the Obama administration announced it would commission a report to study the problem.

     

  • Jaha Dukureh

    jaha dukureh
    Neilson Barnard—Getty Images
    The Gambian activist is a leader in the fight to end female genital mutilation, a practice that affects more than 200 million girls worldwide. Dukureh herself was cut in Gambia when she was just about a week old. At 15, she was sent to the United States to marry a much older and unknown man. When she got married, she learned that she had been subjected to the most extreme form of genital mutilation: her clitoris and labia had been removed, and her vagina had been stitched shut with only a small hole for urination and menstruation. Now remarried and the mother of three, she’s leading a movement to end female genital mutilation worldwide, and raising awareness about the the practice in the United States: after herChange.org petition got more than 220,000 signers, the Obama administration announced it would commission a report to study the problem.
  • Dr. Laura Esserman and Dr. Shelley Hwang

    Dr. Shelley Hwang and Dr. Laura Esserman
    Jim Wilson—The New York Times/Redux; Evan Kafka for TIME
    These oncologists are pioneering an approach to breast cancer that is more personalized and far less invasive than the current standard treatment options. They’re on the front lines of a medical movement that now questions whether difficult repeated surgeries and radiation for early-stage breast cancer, known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), should be the standard of care or whether active surveillance and certain drugs may be sufficient to contain these pre-tumors in some women. Since 20-25% of breast cancers diagnosed through screening are DCIS, Dr. Esserman and Dr. Hwang’s research could affect how breast cancer is treated for thousands of women, and could help prevent needless mastectomies.
    • Christiana Figueres

      Christiana Figueres
      Frederic Stucin
      The Costa Rican diplomat was appointed the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 2010. She’s orchestrated successful international climate conferences, including the landmark Paris meeting in 2015. The Paris Agreement, which requires nearly 200 countriesto commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and invest in addressing climate change, has been widely hailed as the most ambitious climate agreement in history.

      Guo Pei

      guo pei
      Miguel Medina—AFP/Getty Images
      One of China’s most daring and prolific fashion designers is taking the international fashion scene by storm. Known for fantastical designs inspired by the Chinese Imperial Court, Pei designed Rihanna’s famous fur-lined yellow gown with the enormous train from the 2015 Met Gala. Despite her massive following in China, Pei had not shown her work in a major fashion show until January, when she debuted at Paris Fashion Week.

      Mona Hanna-Attisha

      Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha
      Saul Loeb—AFP/Getty Images
      The Flint pediatrician was one of the first to connect the dots between the elevated lead levels in Flint water and health problems in children. As the complaints of Flint parents fell on deaf ears, Dr. Hanna-Attisha was one of the main whistleblowers alerting the public to the Flint water crisis, which is thought to have affected more than 8,000 children under the age of 6. Thanks to her research and activism, officials are now facing criminal charges for allowing Flint children to drink contaminated water.

      Hope Jahren

      hope jahren
      Matt Ching
      The University of Hawaii geochemist and geobiologist is known for her research using stable isotope analysis to analyze fossil forests. She made waves this year with Lab Girl, a bestselling memoir about botany and her life as a scientist, that doubled as a call to action to protect the Earth’s plant life. She’s also beenoutspoken about gender dynamics and sexual harassment in the academic sciences.

      Yayoi Kusama

      Yayoy Kusam
      Alex Majoli—Magnum for TIME
      The 87-year old Japanese artist (who was a contemporary of Andy Warhol’s) is known for her abstract expressionist work that often includes polka dots, patterns, and nets. She works in painting, sculpture, drawing, film and installation, and she’s considered one of Japan’s most prominent contemporary artists. Her installation Infinity Mirrored Room opened the Broad Museum in Los Angeles last fall and drew praise from Adele among many others.

      Sunita Narain

      Sunita Narain
      Courtesy of Centre for Science and Environment
      The director of the Center for Science and Environment has long been one of India’s most prominent environmentalists. She’s led campaigns against Coke and Pepsi for including high levels of pesticides in their sodas (an allegation which both companies vehemently deny). She has campaigned for decades to reduce air pollution in New Delhi. She brings social awareness to her environmentalism, recognizing poor and marginalized populations as crucial for environmental progress.

      Diana Natalicio

      Diana Natalicio
      Joel Salcido
      As President of the University of Texas at El Paso since 1988, Natalicio is thelongest-serving president of a public research University. In the nearly three decades since she took the job, UTEP has transformed from a small commuter school to a major public research university, with a student body that is more than80% Mexican-American (with another 5% who commute directly from Mexico.) She’s a major thought leader in the best ways to help low-income, first-generation students succeed in college.

      General Lori Robinson

      Gen. Lori Robinson
      U.S. Air Force—The New York Times/Redux
      She’s currently the Commander of the Pacific Air Forces, but General Lori Robinson just got a big promotion. In March, Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced that President Obama will nominate General Robinson to be the next head of the Northern Command, putting her in charge of all military activity in North America. If confirmed by the Senate, she will become the first woman to lead a U.S. combatant command, one of the most senior roles in the U.S. Military.

      Kathy Niakan

      Kathy Niakan
      Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

      This developmental biologist is the first ever to receive regulatory approval to use a powerful new gene-editing technology on human embryos. In February, the United Kingdom’s Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority approved Dr. Niakan’s application to use CRISPR–Cas9 to permanently change the genome of human embryos. Her research will lead to a better understanding of which genes are crucial to embryo development, and could help develop new treatments for infertility. Her study is likely the first in what will be a series of experiments in which we make ever more impactful changes to the genome, not only to improve our understanding of disease, but to cure them as well.

      Ibtihaj Muhammad

      ibtihaj muhammed
      Daniel Shea for TIME
      As the first Muslim woman who observes hijab to qualify for the U.S. Olympic Fencing team, Ibtihaj Muhammad is already a pioneer. But she’s also taking political risks, by speaking out against anti-Muslim rhetoric. Her upcoming appearance at the Olympics, wearing hijab, is being hailed as a moment of pride for American Muslims.
  • Mother Earth is Giving Us a Wake-up Call


    We are getting a wake-up call from Mother Earth. It is called climate change. The number of Polar bears is declining by forty percent. This was determined by a study linking the Polar bear population and climate change.

    Why, you ask? Well, the answer is simple. Polar bears rely on ice to have access to the seals which are their main food source. They move from ice flow to ice flow. Ice is also used for resting and breeding. The problem is that the ice is melting. As ice melts, we must understand that it becomes more and more difficult to find ice.

     

    So, realistically, the polar bears are finding less ice to feed from, to breed on and to rest on. This is why the polar bear population is declining rather rapidly. As of 2010, according to an article published in Ecological Applications, there are now only 900 polar bears. It is such a sad thing.

     

    Polar Bear cubs need our help with climate change.

    Polar Bear cubs need our help with climate change.

    We have an urgent call to fix climate control. It is the main reason we are losing our polar bears. Close your eyes, now imagine a world without bears, without any of our wild animals. No bears, big cats, elephants, kangaroos, antelope, or rhinos. We are getting way to close to this being our reality. Now, we need to speak up and demand global action.

     

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    Now, on the other hand, we are making some success in slowing the decline of our tiger population. We have had success even where tiger habitats span national boundaries. India and Nepal have worked together with WWF, World Wildlife Fund, to increase the population of tigers. Their goal is to double the population by 2022.

     

    They are using camera trap images to confirm that tigers use three forested wildlife corridors that provide vital links between protected areas across both sides of the international borders.

     

    Bangladesh has hosted the Second Conference of the Global Tiger Recovery Program. They will do a population count in 2016. So this news is good but there is much to do. You could go overseas and help. You could join the WWF and donate money to save the wild animals. You could work within your own communities to improve climate change. Action is needed. Voices need to be raised to our elected officials here in America.

     

    This world belongs to each and everyone of us. That includes you and I. It also includes our neighbors and our communities.  And it includes the animals we share the planet with.

     

     

    Wild Tigers at Play

    Wild Tigers at Play

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