If the child is safe


 

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Hi everyone,

I was gone taking care of my best friend who had surgery and my sister forgot to let you know. I apologize. I am back and full of energy. So we are off once again.

 

 

 

 

If the Child Is Safe

Marian Wright Edelman

 

 

We pray for children

who sneak popsicles before supper

who erases holes in math workbooks,

who can never find their shoes

And we pray for those

who stare at photographers from behind barbed wire,

who can’t bound down the street in a new pair of sneakers,

who never “counted potatoes,”

who are born in places we wouldn’t be caught dead,

who never go to the circus,

who live in an X-rated world.

We pray for children

who bring us sticky kisses and fists full of dandelions,

who hug us in a hurry and forget their lunch money.

And we pray for those

who never get dessert,

who have not a safe blanket to drag behind them,

who watch their parents watch them die,

who can’t find any bread to steal,

who don’t have any rooms to clean up,

whose pictures aren’t on anybody’s dresser,

whose monsters are real

We pray for children

who spend all their allowance before Tuesday,

who throw tantrums in the grocery store and pick at their food,

who like ghost stories,

who shove dirty clothes under the bed, and never rinse out the tub,

who get visits from the tooth fairy,

who don’t like to be kissed in front of the carpool,

whose tears we sometimes laugh at and whose smiles can make us cry.

And we pray for those

whose nightmares come in the daytime,

who will eat anything,

who have never seen a dentist,

who aren’t spoiled by anybody,

who go to bed hungry and cry themselves to sleep,

who live and move, but have no being.

We pray for children who want to be carried

and for those who must,

for those we never give up on and for those

who don’t get a second chance.

For those we smother…and for those who would grab the hand of anybody kind enough to offer it.

 

 

Mosaic of children from around the world, including, Kayapo, Indian, Native American, Inuit, Balinese, Polynesian, Yanomamo, Cuban, Tsaatan, Moroccan, Mongolian, Karo, Malagasy, and Pakistani.

Mosaic of children from around the world, including, Kayapo, Indian, Native American, Inuit, Balinese, Polynesian, Yanomamo, Cuban, Tsaatan, Moroccan, Mongolian, Karo, Malagasy, and Pakistani.

 

 

 

 

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   Some children are homeless, hungry, scared, bored, sick, with no one to take care of them

 

 

 

A youth embraces his sibling as refugees and migrants reach the shores of the Greek island of Lesbos after crossing the Aegean Sea from Turkey on November 12, 2015. EU leaders attending a summit with their African counterparts approved a 1.8-billion-euro trust fund for Africa aimed at tackling the root causes of mass migration to Europe. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC (Photo credit should read BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

A youth embraces his sibling as refugees and migrants reach the shores of the Greek island of Lesbos after crossing the Aegean Sea from Turkey

I Believe I Need to Clarify


There is just one America Filled with Many Different Peoples

I would like to clarify my previous post as I think some people may have misinterpreted it. What I am talking about is not politics. I am not talking Democrats and Republicans. We are a democracy and we have free speech. Every Republican has the right to express themselves as much as I do.  All I am trying to do is to start an open, honest dialog with all people, of all kinds of beliefs and backgrounds, so that we can learn to understand the differences between us, and — more importantly — recognize that what is different is not inherently bad or evil.  It’s just different, and that is what makes our country so great.

I was speaking about the big picture here in our beloved country. I wasn’t even simply talking about racism, although, racism is a deep-rooted problem. There is racism in all countries, I am sure. But some countries look at blacks and whites with more equality. I do not feel if we asked black people here or in another country if racism is easing quickly, they would agree. In fact, I know they don’t feel that way, at least among those I know. It isn’t just our feelings about black people alone. Minorities of all kinds suffer from discrimination. How often has it taken laws to protect the rights of minorities?  Asians, Hispanics, Puerto Ricans, Haitians, South Africans, indigenous people of all countries, including the USA. After the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1947, we locked Japanese people up in camps even the ones born here in America.

The picture is even bigger than this. We don’t love our neighbors as we love ourselves, if they look different, speak different, have a different religion or religious path. Can peace begin in neighborhoods, cities, let alone countries, if we aren’t practicing it within ourselves and our families? What about hating people who love differently or believe in a different God, or a different facet of the same God? I do believe it has a lot to do with education. If your family raises you to believe that others of a different religion are wrong and will not go to heaven, you probably will believe this when you are an adult. If you are brought up to believe that women are inferior, very often you will treat women as being inferior — even if you are the woman.

To me, the map just gave me this huge picture of the source of our hatred (as in hate crimes) and violence (as in violent crimes). They need to go down. They need to end. Can they end when acceptance and inclusion are moving forward so slowly? I worry that we aren’t making much progress. Bigoted people come in all shapes and sizes and religious persuasions and, yes, political beliefs.

I am sorry if I didn’t explain myself well. I simply wanted to begin a dialog about what people here can do to show more love and inclusiveness to those who are different. I am sending this blog out surrounded with white light and love and a sincere apology to anyone who didn’t understand my whole concept. Yes, the maps triggered my thinking about the problems here in America, but I was not confining them to racism, nor to politics. I meant it to be an example of the fact that we haven’t changed, in the last 150 years, as much as we may believe we have.

Kinds of Love


“Thanks be to God, the very world that birthed us
now is bathed by wondrous nature
in a rapture, of her glorious light;
the splendor of Earth, Air, Fire, Water, now revealed.
And Humankind, highest of creatures,
endowed with Intellect’s might
so that all beasts,
winged and hoofed,
are placed under his command
And Adam’s veins are
with Art, Science, Faith;
he knows the sciences are clear
but the music is weightiest
as a surging ocean
outweighs the very world through which it flows.

If he whose heart’s been moved
by the science of Music’s whole effect
were offered the pleasure of emperorship,
he‘d certainly ignore it
for Man is not alone in his delight
at that sweet sound
since even animals have sacrificed themselves for it.

More stubborn than a donkey,
he who holds that Music’s “impure”;
Ignorant of beauty,
how claim acquaintance with the Lord?

Creator!
the Ocean Surges!
Permit my skiff to reach the shore
–King!
I beg what kindness
-Inayat-
thou canst afford.

—-Translated by Pir Zia Inayat-Khan from the Urdu

Beach House, Fairview Photo by Barbara Mattio

Love one another, but make not a bond of love.
Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.
Fill each other’s cup but drink not from one cup.
Give one another of your bread but eat not from the same loaf.
Sing and dance together and be joyous, but let each one of you be alone.
Even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music.
Give your hearts, but into each other’s keeping.
For only the hand of life can contain your hearts.
And stand together yet not too near together;
For the pillars of the temple stand apart,
And the oak tree and the cypress grow not in each other’s shadow.

—-From The Prophet, Khabil Gibran

Untitled by Keith Haring. 1985. Lithograph

“The Eskimos had fifty-two names for snow because it was important to them; there ought to be as many for Love.”

            —-Margaret Atwood